Rainy day gardening

Gardeners looking for a great rainy day pastime should take a visual stroll through past issues of The Kitchen Gardener.  The very mention of this defunct monthly tweaks the interest of any gardener who was fortunate enough to have been a subscriber.

 

The Kitchen Gardener holds its very high standing as my all time favorite gardening magazine.  Learning past issues are available and featured at VegetableGardener.com is as exciting as harvesting that first batch of peas or chomping down on a sun-ripened, freshly plucked tomato.  A quick look at any one of the photos or articles featured on any given day leads to a wealth of knowledge and experience beneficial to any gardener – seasoned or fresh.

 

My first visit after the website’s launch showed the photo of a seed starting rack.  I cannot swear to this, but I think the construction of my rack – the A-frame pictured in this very un-professional photo

lighted seed starting rack

lighted seed starting rack

is loosely based on this one.  My rack has one set of fluorescent lights for the top shelf and two for the bottom shelf.  My hubby, who thankfully supports my seed starting ventures, built the rack so the shelves lift out and the frame folds flat for storage.  I believe part of his motivation for building this was his desire to corral seed flats to just one area of the house rather than along every sunny window sill … though he may have been slightly urged by my complaints of not having enough sunlight or space to properly start seeds!

 

The Kitchen Gardener offers straightforward, practical, and well-researched advice from actual gardeners – people who know how tough it is to maintain clean fingernails, in spite of using gloves.  So if you’re looking to build a natural-looking garden trellis or bean teepee and lashing techniques that will hold your creation together go here.  Whether interested in carrots or befuddled by moles … the Kitchen Gardener has it covered.

 

Wondering why I might direct readers to gain insight via past issues of the Kitchen Gardener?  First, I applaud Taunton Press, publisher of the former monthly and the current Fine Gardening, in their willingness to keep Kitchen Gardener articles available.  Second, I hope they will find a market for a revamped monthly Kitchen Gardener.  Finally, I’m all for using and building upon the advice of those with hands-on, down-and-dirty knowledge … gardeners learning from gardeners.

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Filed under Edibles, Gardening, General, Seeds, Techniques, Tools

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